Case Study:

David Vargas

 

“I’m realizing that I’m not trying to grow an audience through my writing. Instead, I write to be a better communicator, clarify my thinking, and to supplement the medium in which I’m ACTUALLY trying to grow an audience – engineering.”

  • One of my favorite blogs/online writers is: Kent C. Dodds
  • Best book I’ve read recently is: Drive by Daniel Pink
  • My personal blog / EM newsletter link is: https://davidvargas.me/blog
  • My current job title is: Software Engineer

Why did you first sign up for Write of Passage?

I decided early on in 2020 I wanted to improve my communication skills, which I still view as my biggest weakness. I broke this down into writing, design, and presenting. After attending one of David’s workshops, I then became fascinated by the idea of a personal monopoly and how writing could help me discover mine. I felt myself losing purpose at the job I was at and desperately wanted to find out what I should actually be working on.

What did you like most about the course?  

  1. Live sessions and breakout rooms were great.
  2. Meeting the WoP community, many of whom I still keep in touch with today.
  3. Sharing my writing with others and giving feedback on other people’s writing.  
  4. Circle was phenomenal and I checked it religiously.

What surprised you about the course?

The course was more than just an online writing course. Its lessons could be applied to online creation in general. It helped shift how I thought about my engineering work. I was also not expecting to leave my job by the end of the course!

 How has Write of Passage impacted your creative output?

The first article I ever published was a day before Write of Passage. There are now 47 on my blog. This has been a direct result of setting aside 75 minutes every morning for focused writing.

I started contributing far more code to open source, including the online extension library https://roamjs.com

What advice would you give to a new Write of Passage student? 

The course is truly one of those “you get what you put in”. The more you edit other articles, participate in live sessions, share your writing, participate in Circle, the more you get out of it.

Any final thoughts or recommendations about the course?

The course is not meant to turn you into a better writer immediately. It’s meant to give you the tools, mindset shifts, and habits to develop into a better writer over time. To “complete” the course, you need to keep writing far after the course is over.

I still meet with a morning writing accountability group that formed during the course. I think this would be really cool to form during the course.

I’m realizing that I’m not trying to grow an audience through my writing. Instead, I write to be a better communicator, clarify my thinking, and to supplement the medium in which I’m ACTUALLY trying to grow an audience – engineering.