Case Study:

Jennifer Newcomb Marine

 

“Even though I’ve had a steady writing practice for many years, this approach still removed a substantial layer of anxiety from the process of generating and completing drafts.”

  • My personal blog/newsletter link is: www.letsfailforward.com
  • My current job title is: author and blogger.
  • One of my favorite blogs/online writers is: Sarah Cooper. She’s put in her time as a writer, so now her instantaneous comedic brilliance looks easy. I’ll also read anything by Jack Butcher, who pulls off some pretty profound life lessons with pithy wordplay and pared-down imagery. 
  • Best book I’ve read recently is: Stories That Stick, by Kindra Hall.
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Why did you first sign up for Write of Passage? 

A friend initially pointed me to some Building a Second Brain videos and I ended up linking my way to one of David’s live writing demos. What! Rather than toiling away with mind maps and scattered notes, you could circumvent some of the traditional hand-wringing and write from abundance? I was in.

What did you like most about the course?  

I most enjoyed the live calls, where we practiced some of the techniques, however messily, then met with other students in the breakout rooms to share. Getting and giving feedback on early drafts was invaluable.

What’s your #1 takeaway or lesson learned from WoP?

It’s really encouraging to know that, in many ways, you’re already doing some of the groundwork of writing before your first draft, by capturing ideas and making connections. That brain tickle of linking things together can lead to some happy surprises. Also, the idea of discovering your own personal monopoly was both validating (my quirks are perfect and necessary!) and thought-provoking (but how do I turn these into something actually coherent?).

What surprised you about the course?

Contrary to many other courses I’ve taken, there really was a tight-knit feeling amongst the students. We were in it together. Sharing early drafts takes trust and vulnerability. Everyone was super respectful, caring and obviously rooting for each other.

 How has Write of Passage impacted your creative output?

Even though I’ve had a steady writing practice for many years, this approach still removed a substantial layer of anxiety from the process of generating and completing drafts. I’m currently changing genres and launching a new project, so I look forward to leaning on the framework to generate content and finish a beta course.

What advice would you give to a new Write of Passage student? 

Just remember, if you’re going to be a perfectionist about completing ALL the material, that could just be fear and perfectionism getting in the way of doing. The sheer volume of instruction can be a bit overwhelming, so skim if you need to and come back to it later. Just jump in, try out the exercises, and make sure to attend the live calls and participate, even if it feels a little intimidating. Hanging back is just going to make you regret the missed opportunities later!

Any final thoughts or recommendations about the course?

I very much appreciated all the hard work and heart that David put into the course, ensuring that each and every person got it and transformed their scarcity mentality into one of possibility and even writing joy. Will was a wonderful manager too, attentive and supportive. I was genuinely sad when the course ended and am really grateful for the experience and all that I learned. Thank you!